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Corns

What are they?

Corns are the hard, thickened areas of skin, which frequently are located on the top, ends, and outer portions of toes. Corns are our body’s response to chronic friction and pressure. The response is to build up skin to protect the area of friction. Often times, an underlying section of bone beneath the corn is the culprit. As the skin builds up so does the pressure and pain to the area. III fitted shoes, abnormal toe structure, and arthritic conditions are common causes of these annoying lesions.

How do you treat them?

It seems obvious that with most any existing ailment of the body, one of three things can happen. The condition can improve and go away, it can stay the same or it can become worse. Corns are an orthopedic condition and either one has to accommodate the deformity to try to make it go away or correct the deformity. First of all, it is essential to check and modify if necessary, one's shoes so as to minimize excessive pressure at the area involved. Quite often, wearing a better-fitted shoe is enough to remedy the problem. Secondly, one should stay away from store bought medicinal pads and sharp cutting instruments as possible remedies. Self-abuse through the improper use of these items can often result in more serious damage to the skin. A third and most important suggestion for the person with a painful corn is that he seeks professional care.

Appropriate care for this problem is often necessary in order to correct or at least, prevent further progressive changes. Treating one's own foot problem is not necessarily detrimental when performed carefully and under the right conditions. The diabetic, the older aged individual, or the person with obvious circulatory problems are certainly in need of professional care and should not attempt self-treatment procedures. There are some surgical approaches to the treatment of corns to attempt to permanently correct the condition. Everyone can live with a non painful corn, but when the pain interrupts one's daily walking, it often requires professional management.


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